Mutual Exclusion Problems with Mutex and Semaphore - Programing Languages (Mutex Vs Semaphores )

The mutex is a significantly safer mechanism to use for implementing mutual exclusion around shared resources. There are still a couple of problems that use of the Mutex (in preference to Semaphore) will not solve. These are:
  1. Circular deadlock
  2. Non-cooperation

Circular Deadlock
Circular deadlock, often referred to as the “deadly embrace” problem is a condition where two or more tasks develop a circular dependency of mutual exclusion. Simply put, one task is blocked waiting on a mutex owned by another task. That other task is also block waiting on a mutex held by the first task.

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Mutex
Semaphores
Differences between Mutex And Semaphore


An example a small control system as shown above. The system is made up of three tasks, a low priority Control task, a medium priority System Identification (SI) task and a high priority Alarm task. There is an analogue input shared by the Control and the SI tasks, which is protected by a mutex. There is also an analogue output protected by a different mutex.

The Control task waits for mutexes ADC and DAC:
mutex_lock (ADC);
mutex_lock (DAC);
/* critical section */
mutex_unlock (ADC);
mutex_unlock (DAC);

The SI Task waits for mutexes DAC and ADC:

mutex_lock (DAC);
mutex_lock (ADC);
/* critical section */
mutex_unlock (DAC);
mutex_unlock (ADC);

Unfortunately, under certain timing conditions, this can lead to deadlock. In this example the Control task has locked the ADC, but before locking the DAC has been pre-empted by the higher priory SI task. The SI task then locks the DAC and tries to lock the ADC. The SI task is now blocked as the ADC is already owned by the Control task. The Control task now runs and tries to lock the DAC. It is blocked as the DAC is held by the SI task. Neither task can continue until the mutex is unlocked and neither mutex can be unlocked until either task runs – classic deadlock.




For circular deadlock to occur the following conditions must all be true:

  1. A thread has exclusive use of resources (Mutual exclusion)
  2. A thread can hold on to a resource(s) whilst waiting for another resource (Hold and wait)
  3. A circular dependency of thread and resources is set up (Circular waiting)
  4. A thread never releases a resource until it is completely finished with it (No resource preemption)

These conditions can be addressed in a number of ways. For example, a design policy may stipulate that if a task needs to lock more than one mutex it must either lock all or none.


Priority Ceiling Protocol

With the Priority Ceiling Protocol (PCP) method each mutex has a defined priority ceiling, set to that of the highest priority task which uses the mutex. Any task using a mutex executes at its own priority – until a second task attempts to acquire the mutex. At this point it has its priority raised to the ceiling value, preventing suspension and thus eliminating the “hold and wait” condition.

In the deadlock example shown before, the significant point is when the SI task tries to lock the DAC. Before that succeeded and lead to cyclic deadlock. However with a PCP mutex, both the ADC and DAC mutex will have a ceiling priority equal to the SI’s task priority. When the SI task tries to lock the DAC, then the run-time system will detect that the SI’s task priority is not higher than the priority of the locked mutex ADC. The run-time system suspends the SI task without locking the DAC mutex. The control task now inherits the priority of the SI task and resumes execution.

Non-cooperation

The last, but most important aspect of mutual exclusion covered in these ramblings relies on one founding principle: we have to rely on all tasks to access critical regions using mutual exclusion primitives. Unfortunately this is dependent on the design of the software and cannot be detected by the run-time system. This final problem was addressed by Tony Hoare, called the Monitor.
 

The Monitor

The monitor is a mechanism not typically supplied by the RTOS, but something the programmer tends to build (a notable exception is Ada95′s protected object mechanism). A monitor simply encapsulates the shared resource and the locking mechanism into a single construct (e.g. a C++ Object that encapsulates the mutex mechanism). Access to the shared resource, then, is through a controlled interface which cannot be bypassed (i.e. the application never explicitly calls the mutex, but calls upon access functions).

The underlying difference between the Semaphores and the Mutex is the Principle of Ownership. Given the principle of ownership a particular implementation of a mutex may support Recursion, Priority inheritance and Death Detection.

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